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Archive for July, 2011

06 July
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Reciprocal Behavior in Social Networks

Deleting Circles in Google Plus

I realize that I’ve been talking nonstop about Google+ lately. The thing is, when you’re at the BEGINNING of a new social network, you can learn some things that you’ve forgotten from your experiences with other networks. Google Plus is shiny and new, and it’s Google, so there are lots of things to consider ( as you saw in my Google+ 50). We’ll talk about non-Google-Plus stuff shortly, I promise.

Follow Me and I’ll Follow You?

I asked a question in Google+ that you might also consider:

Several people are mentioning they think reciprocal follows (if you follow me, I should follow you) SHOULDN’T be the norm on Google+ . What do YOU think?

Should You Reciprocate Following Behavior on a Social Network?

On Twitter, I follow everyone back who follows me, and I delete the spammers. I do this because I think of it as a courtesy. But the truth is, I don’t READ your posts all that often. How could I? I follow almost 200,000 people. If I followed one post from each person, and it took me a few seconds to read, each, that would be over 6700 HOURS of reading right there. My choice to follow back was a choice of courtesy. It also allows you to send me a direct message, which I think of as a nice courtesy (do you?)

But here’s what people said to the above question inside of Google+ (just a sampling of the almost 100 comments I got in the first few hours of posting it):

  • C.C. Chapman – I agree. Circles allow you to filter what you see. The power of Google+ lies in ME being in control of what I see.
  • Blake Sabatinelli – They shouldn’t be the norm. This will cut down on the noise…
  • Josh Fisher – I think, sure. Fresh chance to build your stream based solely on the CONTENT you find worthwhile, not based on expected social behavior.
  • Steven Hodson – I agree .. we have a chance to build a network of people that actually mean something to us.
  • Sthitaprajna Jena – It shouldn’t be reciprocal at all. If they like what you post, they follow you. Doesn’t have to mean you need to follow them
  • Christiaan Conover – Agreed. We need to stop thinking of it as a parallel to Facebook. The automatic two-way connection on Facebook is part of the problem.
  • Zack Hanebrink – That’s the beauty of circles, you can filter it how you like, so really doesn’t matter at the end of the day.
  • Ryan Speed – I think it’s a personal preference and just like other social networking sites, it’s not really something that a “best practices/expected use” policy should apply to.
  • Jen Reeves – I’m torn with this. I started out with reciprocal follows with Twitter an met so many new people that way. I haven’t been as reciprocal in G+ land.
  • Pedro Dias – If you want to make the most of any social service you follow people that interest you the most, not based on reciprocity.
  • Melissa Reyes – It should NOT be the norm. Follow people who will inspire you, teach you or make you laugh. Follow people you like!
  • Alana Joy – Initially, that was my strategy, however as more and more people began to follow it became more of a chore than anything and diluted even the “Following” circles stream. For brands, the circles will be ideal and the ability to show that kind of reciprocity will do well, but for individuals… keep it simple.
  • Shannon Clark – I’m not going to reciprocate. My circles will be limited to folks whom I want to send content out to (with the small exception of my “following” circle where I’ll add folks I want to be able to monitor easily w/o reciprocation expected. I’ll leave the 100′s of folks who follow me whom I don’t know in the “incoming” stream for now
  • Daniel Foster – Reciprocation is unsustainable. But it was cool to see that +Chris Brogan added me to a circle even though I’m a nobody. I’ll just imagine the name of that circle to be something nicer than “Nobodies Who Followed Me”
  • Jay Baer – Agreed. The notion of reciprocity is what killed Twitter as a true conversation venue.

It’s Obviously Your Choice

You can do what you want, obviously. Do what makes you feel comfortable. It’s your network.

The reason I reciprocated on Twitter was exactly related to what Daniel Foster said above:

Daniel Foster – Reciprocation is unsustainable. But it was cool to see that +Chris Brogan added me to a circle even though I’m a nobody. I’ll just imagine the name of that circle to be something nicer than “Nobodies Who Followed Me”

I never wanted to be perceived to be some kind of jerk who thinks he’s amazing and who doesn’t relate to other people well. Daniel represents the minds/moods of a LOT of people I come across in the social media world, and you might be ready to tell me that “that’s their problem” and that if their self-esteem hinges on whether you follow them back or not, then they’re maladjusted, but it’s just not true. We ALL like to feel like we’re on the inside of something. I dare you to disagree with that.

The other reason to reciprocate is that it builds a longer/larger broadcasting network capability. You can reach more people because their reciprocity puts your words in front of their eyes, in the pure marketing sense of things. That’s up to you how you use that power, and people who spam with it get unfollowed pretty quickly. But in my mind, that’s something to consider as well.

How Do You Build Your Social Networks?

How have YOU built your social networks? What value do you get from them? And how has that worked for you in the social networks where you play right now?


05 July
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Paying attention to the attention economy

Most of us are happily obsessed with the economy of money. We earn it and we spend it and we generally pay attention to what things cost.

Certainly, salespeople and marketers are truly focused on the price of things, on commissions and shelving allowances and net margin and the cost of goods sold.

With all of these easily measured activity, it's easy to overlook the fast-growing and ever more important economy based around attention.

"If I alert my entire customer base, how much will this cost me in permission?"

"How much time do we save our customers with a better written manual?"

"When we fail to ask for (and reward) the privilege of following up, are we wasting permission?"

"Does launching this product to an audience of stangers waste the attention we're going to have to buy?"

Attention is a bit like real estate, in that they're not making any more of it. Unlike real estate, though, it keeps going up in value.

05 July
Comments Off

Paying attention to the attention economy

Most of us are happily obsessed with the economy of money. We earn it and we spend it and we generally pay attention to what things cost.

Certainly, salespeople and marketers are truly focused on the price of things, on commissions and shelving allowances and net margin and the cost of goods sold.

With all of these easily measured activity, it's easy to overlook the fast-growing and ever more important economy based around attention.

"If I alert my entire customer base, how much will this cost me in permission?"

"How much time do we save our customers with a better written manual?"

"When we fail to ask for (and reward) the privilege of following up, are we wasting permission?"

"Does launching this product to an audience of stangers waste the attention we're going to have to buy?"

Attention is a bit like real estate, in that they're not making any more of it. Unlike real estate, though, it keeps going up in value.

05 July
Comments Off

Paying attention to the attention economy

Most of us are happily obsessed with the economy of money. We earn it and we spend it and we generally pay attention to what things cost.

Certainly, salespeople and marketers are truly focused on the price of things, on commissions and shelving allowances and net margin and the cost of goods sold.

With all of these easily measured activity, it's easy to overlook the fast-growing and ever more important economy based around attention.

"If I alert my entire customer base, how much will this cost me in permission?"

"How much time do we save our customers with a better written manual?"

"When we fail to ask for (and reward) the privilege of following up, are we wasting permission?"

"Does launching this product to an audience of stangers waste the attention we're going to have to buy?"

Attention is a bit like real estate, in that they're not making any more of it. Unlike real estate, though, it keeps going up in value.

05 July
Comments Off

Paying attention to the attention economy

Most of us are happily obsessed with the economy of money. We earn it and we spend it and we generally pay attention to what things cost.

Certainly, salespeople and marketers are truly focused on the price of things, on commissions and shelving allowances and net margin and the cost of goods sold.

With all of these easily measured activity, it's easy to overlook the fast-growing and ever more important economy based around attention.

"If I alert my entire customer base, how much will this cost me in permission?"

"How much time do we save our customers with a better written manual?"

"When we fail to ask for (and reward) the privilege of following up, are we wasting permission?"

"Does launching this product to an audience of stangers waste the attention we're going to have to buy?"

Attention is a bit like real estate, in that they're not making any more of it. Unlike real estate, though, it keeps going up in value.

05 July
Comments Off

Paying attention to the attention economy

Most of us are happily obsessed with the economy of money. We earn it and we spend it and we generally pay attention to what things cost.

Certainly, salespeople and marketers are truly focused on the price of things, on commissions and shelving allowances and net margin and the cost of goods sold.

With all of these easily measured activity, it's easy to overlook the fast-growing and ever more important economy based around attention.

"If I alert my entire customer base, how much will this cost me in permission?"

"How much time do we save our customers with a better written manual?"

"When we fail to ask for (and reward) the privilege of following up, are we wasting permission?"

"Does launching this product to an audience of stangers waste the attention we're going to have to buy?"

Attention is a bit like real estate, in that they're not making any more of it. Unlike real estate, though, it keeps going up in value.

05 July
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How to Blog With Google Plus

I have two ideas for how you can “blog” (sort of) with Google+ . The first is this:

Blogging with Google+

I started with some text and a video uploaded, and then I rushed in and commented in a few links to subsequent YouTube videos. Then, with that done, I had basically fashioned a “bundle” of content (Hat tip, @Kosso, for the same term I was thinking).

Blogging With Google+

First, I don’t think Google+ replaces blogs yet. Not sure that it ever will. But that’s not the question. The question was whether I could multi-media up a post, because right now, the methodology is you can write text and then include one of the following:

  • Link to a URL
  • Photo
  • Video

But not any combo of the three.

So, here’s what I did.

  1. Start a new stream post, and upload video (to be the starting point of the story). Click publish.
  2. Comment immediately (as fast as I can) and add links or text or whatever else.
  3. Voila – a bundle/blog post.

Version 2 of Blogging with Google+

Another way this could be done and encourage collaboration would be to do the following:

  1. Pick a post-type (again, I’d probably start with video), and just write up your text, upload your video and publish.
  2. Create another full post-type and add the next element. This is where you could do a collaboration, because if you asked people all to create a post on their account and then have them message you the links to those posts (every post in G+ has a unique URL), then that’s a fun collaboration.
  3. Start a NEW post, and top that with something (video!), and then in the comments below, link up all the G+ posts people had made in the comments section.

Inelegant, easy to make mistakes, and likely to be confusing for most, I admit. But it’s a start. Mind you, I had to copy/paste REALLY quick, and even then, Shel Holtz showed up and dropped in a random comment pretty quickly. (No worries, Shel. If not you, than someone).

One Way to Hack Even That

You COULD post this at first to just yourself, then you’d have all the editing time in the world. Then, you could edit who you’ve shared the post with, and poof – I’ve invented “drafts.”

Only, I just tested it out and it didn’t work. You can’t edit SHARING, it turns out, so I’m left without a way to make it work. Do YOU have any ideas?

What do you think?


04 July
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Give and get

The stability, power and longevity of a tribe is directly related to the way it is treated by its members.

When many of them seek to take, to enrich themselves and to find a loophole or advantage, the group is weakened.

Culture and management are not the same thing--when we strengthen our organization, when we encourage and respect our fellow employees, management follows. Group up, not top down.

Society and government are not the same thing either. The tribe we get is the tribe we build.

I don't think we can abdicate our responsibilities within a tribe to the leader.

The opportunity is simple: the more each individual gives, the more each of us end up getting.

04 July
Comments Off

Give and get

The stability, power and longevity of a tribe is directly related to the way it is treated by its members.

When many of them seek to take, to enrich themselves and to find a loophole or advantage, the group is weakened.

Culture and management are not the same thing--when we strengthen our organization, when we encourage and respect our fellow employees, management follows. Group up, not top down.

Society and government are not the same thing either. The tribe we get is the tribe we build.

I don't think we can abdicate our responsibilities within a tribe to the leader.

The opportunity is simple: the more each individual gives, the more each of us end up getting.

04 July
Comments Off

Give and get

The stability, power and longevity of a tribe is directly related to the way it is treated by its members.

When many of them seek to take, to enrich themselves and to find a loophole or advantage, the group is weakened.

Culture and management are not the same thing--when we strengthen our organization, when we encourage and respect our fellow employees, management follows. Group up, not top down.

Society and government are not the same thing either. The tribe we get is the tribe we build.

I don't think we can abdicate our responsibilities within a tribe to the leader.

The opportunity is simple: the more each individual gives, the more each of us end up getting.